Last edited by Akinorisar
Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

4 edition of Sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems found in the catalog.

Sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems

Sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems

final report 1, August 1995 for the period April 1987 to August 1994

  • 104 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Technical Information Service, distributor in [Washington, DC, Springfield, Va .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementprepared by AC Koller ... [et al.].
Series[NASA contractor report] -- NASA CR-195410., NASA contractor report -- NASA CR-195410.
ContributionsKoller, A. C., United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17803900M
OCLC/WorldCa35598232

History has shown that advancements in materials science and engineering have been important drivers in the development of sensor technologies. For instance, the temperature sensitivity of electrical resistance in a variety of materials was noted in the early s and was applied by Wilhelm von. The results of a literature survey and concept analysis related to sensing techniques for measuring of surface temperature, strain, and heat flux for (non-specific) ceramic materials exposed to elevated temperatures (to K) are summarized. Concepts capable of functioning in a gas turbine hot section environment are favored but others are reviewed also.

Sensors (ISSN ; CODEN: SENSC9) is the leading international peer-reviewed open access journal on the science and technology of sensors. Sensors is published semi-monthly online by MDPI. The Polish Society of Applied Electromagnetics (PTZE) and Japan Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (JSPRS) are affiliated with Sensors and their members receive a discount on the . During Task 1, an extensive survey was conducted of sensor concepts which have the potential for measuring surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion.

Specific advanced composite systems needed for advanced engines are shown in Table , along with propulsion applications for the HSCT and the advanced subsonic transport. Before any design incorporation and application can be considered, there must be adequate demonstration of both materials and processing technology readiness to support the. The need to consider ceramic sensing elements is brought about by the temperature limits of metal thin film sensors in propulsion system applications. Longer-term stability of thin film sensors made of noble metals has been demonstrated at °C for 25 h [4].Cited by:


Share this book
You might also like
nervous system

nervous system

From office-boy to publisher

From office-boy to publisher

Enlightenment through the bath of rebirth

Enlightenment through the bath of rebirth

Assessment of farmland for tax purposes in Washington and other states

Assessment of farmland for tax purposes in Washington and other states

Economic broadcast acknowledgement for store-and-forward packet switching

Economic broadcast acknowledgement for store-and-forward packet switching

Slots

Slots

Quirindi

Quirindi

Christian mysticism

Christian mysticism

Information needs in fashion design

Information needs in fashion design

history of Storegra Farm

history of Storegra Farm

On record

On record

How the gospel spread through Europe

How the gospel spread through Europe

Myths, men & beer

Myths, men & beer

CONTINENTAL ENGINEERING

CONTINENTAL ENGINEERING

The state weather-cocks

The state weather-cocks

Sea-fairies, and other poems.

Sea-fairies, and other poems.

Sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems Download PDF EPUB FB2

Sensors for Ceramic Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems Summary of Literature Survey and Concept Analysis Task 3 Report Prepared by W.H. Bennethum L.T. Sherwood G E,4ircraft En,ines,4dvam'ed Technolo,k'y OIwrati°" Cincinnati.

Ohio August Prepared for National Aeronautics and Space Administration Lewis Research Center Contract NAS @article{osti_, title = {Sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems: summary of literature survey and concept analysis, task 3 report}, author = {Bennethum, W H and Sherwood, L T}, abstractNote = {The results of a literature survey and concept analysis related to sensing techniques for measuring of surface temperature, strain, and heat flux for (non-specific) ceramic.

Sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems: summary of literature survey and concept analysis, task 3 report Author: W H Bennethum ; L T Sherwood ; GE Aircraft Engines (Firm) ; Lewis Research Center.

Get this from a library. Development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems: final report. [W H Atkinson; R R Strange; United. Sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems: final report 1, August for the period April to August Author: A C Koller ; United States.

Recommendation are made for sensor development in each of the three areas. The results of a literature survey and concept analysis related to sensing techniques for measuring of surface temperature, strain, and heat flux for (non-specific) ceramic materials exposed to elevated temperatures (to K) are by: Sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems.

a survey of the current methods for the measurement of surface temperature of ceramic materials suitable for use as hot section flowpath components in aircraft gas turbine engines; (2) analysis and selection of three sensing techniques with potential to extend surface.

measurement of surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion systems and to conduct laboratory development of sensor systems for the measurement of surface temperatures. A survey and analysis of sensor concepts that could be used on ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems was recently carried out 1'2.

Measurement of surface temperature and heat flux was evaluated in these works and a discussion of the need. A survey and analysis of sensor concepts that could be used on ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems was recently carried out 1 '2.

Measurement of surface temperature and heat flux was evaluated in these works and a discussion of the need. Propulsion System Environments • High gas temperatures • High material temperatures (>°C) • Rapid thermal transients • High gas flows • High combustion chamber pressures Wire-based sensors are bulky and disruptive to the true operating environment •Air breathing propulsion systems •Chemical propulsion systems.

Advanced high temperature materials and sensors are crosscutting technologies which can be used in component and subsystem applications essential in the design, development and health maintenance/detection needs of future generations of aeronautical and space propulsion systems.

Proposals are sought that address. for Ceramic Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems" program (NAS). During Task 1, an extensive survey was conducted of sensor concepts which have the potenti a1 for measuring surface temperature, strain, and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion systems.

Each sensor concept was analyzed andFile Size: 4MB. sensors for advanced turbine engine components. Stable, high temperature thin film ceramic thermocouples have been demonstrated in the lab, and novel methods of fabricating sensors have been developed.

To fabricate thin film heat flux sensors for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems, the rough and porous nature of the CMC systemFile Size: 4MB. The 'Development of Sensors for Ceramics Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems' program was divided into two phases.

The objectives of Phase 1 were to analyze, evaluate and recommend sensor concepts for the measurement of surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion by: 6.

The 'development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems' program is divided into two phases. The objectives of Phase 1 were to analyze, evaluate and recommend sensor concepts for the measurement of surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion by: 1.

Development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems: phase II, temperature sensor systems evaluation. [United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.;]. Development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems [microform]: final report: survey and evaluation of measurement techniques for temperature, strain, and heat flux for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems / W.

Atkinson, M. Cyr, and R. Strange National Aeronautics and Space Administration. CoorsTek leads the market in ceramic sensor components - delivering overadvanced ceramic sensor components every year.

For over three decades, CoorsTek has helped OEMs and their suppliers select the best design, material, process, and secondary services to ensure exceptional quality and high-performance sensor components.

The 'Development of Sensors for Ceramics Components in Advanced Propulsion Systems' program was divided into two phases. The objectives of Phase 1 were to analyze, evaluate and recommend sensor concepts for the measurement of surface temperature, strain and heat flux on ceramic components for advanced propulsion systems.

selected sensor applications for structural monitoring and control Advanced sensors and actuators, together with exponential improvements in computer technology, are causing a surge of interest in the development of "intelligent" structures and equipment.Advanced high temperature materials, structures and sensors are crosscutting technologies which are essential in the design, development and health maintenance/detection needs of components and subsystems that will be needed in future generations of aeronautical and space propulsion systems.

Atkinson W H, Cyr M A and Strange R R Development of sensors for ceramic components in advanced propulsion systems. Phase II - temperature sensor systems evaluation Report No NASA-CR (Washington, DC: National Cited by: