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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Nomination of Newton N. Minow, to be a member of the Federal Communications Commission. found in the catalog.

Nomination of Newton N. Minow, to be a member of the Federal Communications Commission.

United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce

Nomination of Newton N. Minow, to be a member of the Federal Communications Commission.

Hearing, Eighty-seventh Congress, first session

by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce

  • 329 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Govt. Print. Off. in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Minow, Newton N., -- 1926-,
  • United States. -- Federal Communications Commission -- Officials and employees -- Selection and appointment

  • The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 25 p. ;c24 cm
    Number of Pages25
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15010447M
    LC Control Number61060756

    adequate.8 Newton Minow, writing to the President upon completion of his service as Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, noted that although "[p]olicy making is the critical responsibility of the agency it is precisely in this area that the agencies have been markedly deficient." Dean Landis came to similarly critical.   The Influence of American Television on Audiences On Ap , the first television broadcast was unveiled to the audiences of North America at the New York World’s Fair opening in Flushing Meadows, Queens. Feelings of awe and amazement were shared throughout the crowds. However, with the emergence of the Second World War in the very same year, real growth for .

      CHICAGO - The popularity of Robert Caro's magisterial new book on Lyndon Johnson is easy to understand. Passage to Power evokes a time when the ability of government to do good was largely unquestioned, and when a gargantuan personality such as LBJ could -- and did -- use government to unite the country in the pursuit of sweeping goals and giant tasks.   Julius Genachowski and Newton Minow spoke about the future of the telecommunications industry, their experiences as chairmen at the Federal Communications Commission, and the impact of new.

      Newton N. Minow, Sidney and Austin, and Former Chair, Federal Communications Commission. About the Author. Fred H. Cate is professor of law and Ira C. Batman Faculty Fellow at the Indiana University School of Law, Bloominton, and is a visiting scholar at Reviews: 2.   May 9th, Newton N. Minow stands in front of a convention of the National Association of Broadcasters to give his first big speech, “Television and the Public Interest.” Minow was appointed by President John F Kennedy himself, as the new chairman of the Federal Communication Commission (FCC).


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Nomination of Newton N. Minow, to be a member of the Federal Communications Commission by United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce Download PDF EPUB FB2

Newton Norman "Newt" Minow (born Janu ) is an American attorney and former Chair of the Federal Communications speech referring to television as a "vast wasteland" is cited even as the speech has passed its 55th still maintaining a law practice, Minow is currently the Honorary Consul General of Singapore in en: Martha, Nell, Mary.

Nomination of Newton N. Minow, to be a member of the Federal Communications Commission: hearing before the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, United States Senate, Eighty-seventh Congress, first session, on the nomination of Newton N.

Minow to be a member of the Federal Communications Commission for the unexpired term from July 1,and for a 7-year. Surely the most prominent of them is Newton N. Minow, the former chairman of the Federal Communications Commission who, at 26, essentially ran Author: Todd Purdum.

Newton Norman "Newt" Minow (born Janu ) is an American attorney and former Chair of the Federal Communications speech referring to television as a "vast wasteland" is cited even as the speech has passed its 55th still maintaining a law practice, Minow is currently the Honorary Consul General of Singapore in Chicago.

by Newton N. Minow. Edited by Lawrence Laurent. Atheneum. $ Newton N. Minow came to the post of Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission in with estimable qualities. He was intelligent, energetic, and forthright.

He owed no debts to the broadcasting industry and had no ambitions to become a TV executive some day soon. MINOW, Newton Norman (b. 17 January in Milwaukee, Wisconsin), attorney and Democratic Party activist appointed by President John F.

Kennedy as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC); inextricably linked to the s as the person who called television "a vast wasteland."Minow, son of Jay A. Minow, who operated a profitable chain of laundries, and Doris Stein Minow.

“The point of debates was to bring everybody together to watch and listen and learn,” said Newton N. Minow, President John F. Kennedy’s chairman of the Federal Communications Commission and. Read an excerpt from "Television and the Public Interest" and answer the question. The speech was delivered by Newton N.

Minow, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, to the nation’s television executives in [1] But when television is bad, nothing is worse. The Newton Minow Page "At a very young age Minow became a leading figure both on the governor's [Adlai Stevenson] staff and in his presidential campaigns of and During the latter, Minow became acquainted with members of the Kennedy circle and in worked for the Kennedy presidential bid, becoming close friends with the President's brother, Robert.

Inin a speech to the National Association of Broadcasters, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Newton N. Minow decried the majority of television programming as a "vast wasteland.". Newton N. Minow, senior counsel of Sidley Austin, was chairman of the Federal Communications Commission under President John F.

Kennedy. Boston Globe video Follow Us. Newton N. Minow. On the C-SPAN Networks: Newton N. Minow was a Chair for the Federal Communications Commission with 34 videos in the C-SPAN Video Library; the first appearance was a Forum as. Visit of Newton N. Minow, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), & family | About Folder.

Digital Identifier: JFKWHPF. Title: Visit of Newton N. Minow, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), & family Federal Communications Commission. On May 9,Newton N. Minow, the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission ("FCC" or "Commission"), gave what is probably the most famous speech ever delivered by the head of an American regulatory agency.

It remains the single most searing indictment of television. Newton Minow: The 'vast wasteland' of television speech.

In his first major speech after being appointed chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) by the newly elected President John F Kennedy, Newton Minow coined a phrase that was used by critics of American television's programming standards for years to come.

Television and the Public Interest" was a speech given by Federal Communications Commission (FCC) chairman Newton N. Minow to the convention of the National Association of Broadcasters on May 9, The speech was Minow's first major speech after he was appointed chairman of the FCC by President John F Kennedy.

Interviewing Newton Minow, Chicago lawyer and chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. He discusses broadcasting as a public service and spends a great deal of time on the history of commercials and how they changed over time.

cedure Act, 55 Go. L.J. () ; Loevinger, Book Review, 68 COLum. REV.(). 9 Suggestions for Improvement of the Administrative Process: Letter to President Kennedy from Newton N.

Minow, Chairman, Federal Communications Commission, 15 AD. REv. () (emphasis in original) [hereinafter cited as Minow. On May 9,Newton N.

Minow gave his first public address as Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission ("FCC" or "Commission"). (1) Little was known at that time about the new Chairman, other than that he was the youngest person ever to hold the job and that he was not part of the Washington establishment.

On May 9,Newton N. Minow, the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC” or “Commission”), gave what is probably the most famous speech ever delivered by the head of an American regulatory agency.

It remains the single most searing indictment of television. Before the National Association of Broadcasters (“NAB. On May 9,Newton Minow, the chairman of the U.S.

Federal Communications Commission, achieved instant immortality when, in a speech before the National Association of Broadcasters, he referred to the offerings of American television as a “vast wasteland.”. Minow, a Chicago attorney, was chairman of the Federal Communications Commission from to His column first appeared in the Chicago Tribune.

0 comments.Media in category "Newton Minow" The following 3 files are in this category, out of 3 total. Chairman Pai and Former FCC Chairman Newton Minow ().png × 1,; MB.